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Britain is in the dark quite literally


Lights going out, Police cuts and Army cuts what can go wrong? it's almost like the film the purge is coming true, is that their plan? 
Reduced street lighting at night does not lead to an increase in crime or car crashes, a report suggests.
Researchers analysed 14 years of data from 62 councils in England and Wales which had tried strategies such as permanently switching off lights or dimming them.
They said the findings could help save money and reduce carbon emissions.
The AA said the results were "extremely surprising" and differed from their own analysis of inquest findings.
The Local Government Association (LGA) said reducing street lighting does not happen everywhere but the research appeared to support some councils' decision "to save taxpayers' money and improve the environment without compromising public safety".

'No evidence'

The study, led by the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine in partnership with University College London and published in the Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health, looked at councils which had implemented a range of schemes.
These included switching lights off permanently, reducing the number of hours that lamps are switched on at night, dimming lights, and replacing traditional lamps with energy-efficient LED lamps.
To assess crime, they looked at data from 2010 to 2013 to analyse how many crimes took place in different areas and the types of street lighting used there.
They focused on offences more likely to occur at night, including burglary, theft of or from a vehicle, robbery, violence and sexual assault.
Overall, there was no evidence of an association between reduced lighting and increased crime.
They also looked at all roads in participating authorities, examining what type of street lighting was used and the number of traffic collisions that happened at night relative to the day during 2000 to 2013.
They found no evidence of a link between reduced street lighting and night-time collisions.

'Little chance'

Lead investigator Dr Phil Edwards said: "An estimated £300m is spent every year on street lights in the UK.
"At a time when local authorities need to make spending cuts, our findings show that by carefully assessing risks, street lighting can be reduced without an increase in car crashes and crime."
Co-author Prof Shane Johnson said while the findings were "very encouraging", any changes to lighting "should be managed carefully".

Armed forces job cuts reach target three years early

The number of British army personnel has been cut back by 20,000 - three years ahead of target.
Ministry of Defence figures show there are currently 81,700 full-time servicemen and women in the Army, down from 102,260 in 2010.
More reservists are being recruited but that process has been slow.
Former commander Richard Kemp said it showed the plan was "incoherent" but the MoD said the Army had the "manpower we need at the moment".
Col Kemp, a commander of British forces in Afghanistan, told the BBC News website: "To have already made the cuts by 2015, it shows confusion and targets that don't match up... it doesn't mean it's a good thing.
"The whole plan was to cover the gaps with reservists, but if you've not achieved that then it must mean that we have got deficiencies.
"Not only does that cause us concern about how we govern our people, but it is also the message we are sending to our enemies. That kind of message always shows aggression towards us."

'Brave experiment'

Plans to increase the number of Army reservists from 19,000 to 30,000 by 2019 have been controversial.
As of April 2015, the number of trained reservists was at 21,030 - an increase of just over 1,000 since April 2012.
Former chief of the defence staff General Lord Richards has referred to the plan as "a brave experiment", while John Gearson, professor of national security studies at Kings College, London said: "I think it is accepted that the recruitment programme has underperformed.
Some UK police forces are using overtime to cover gaps caused by staff shortages, BBC Radio 5 live has found.
One Met Police officer received an overtime payment of £45,000 last year, according to new figures obtained under a Freedom of Information request.
The police overtime bill in England and Wales totalled almost £1bn over three years and went up by £6m last year.
The Home Office said the government had "already taken steps to reduce unnecessary overtime payments".
"We have asked the independent Police Remuneration Review Body to consider whether more can be done on this issue," said a spokesman.
"Police officers' pay should reflect the difficult work they do - but the public rightly expects that this is not abused."
The National Police Chiefs' Council said it was "only right" that officers should be compensated for overtime.
Is government planning a purge type chaos on Britain's streets with immigrants trying to get into our country and British media turning people against them (as if they are some sort of monster), police cuts, Army cuts and lights going out of a night are we heading to a planned civil war? 

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